Truths
  • Let's start with a simple blue.

    The culprit is Sir Charles, with Jorge as an accomplice.

    Sir Charles wanted the Argos Engine and didn't want to risk losing the case against the museum, so he impersonated Miss Mystery and hosted the gala. He paid Jorge off to help him with the crime.

    The glass case was, infact, not chemically bonded, but locked with an electromagnetic lock (the glass reaches into a groove in the floor, and the electromagnetic lock is under there, holding the glass in place)

    Charles had Jorge plant the EMP device when he was alone in the security room. When the EMP goes off, it blows the fuse, thus disabling the electromagnetic lock in addition to the lights.

    During the chaos, Charles removed the now-movable glass, took the Argos Engine, placed the card there, then put the glass back. He then hid it somewhere on the venue, in a hidden compartment or maybe the male bathroom. After all, he's the owner of the property so there may be a hidden compartment only he knows about.

    Once the light was fixed, the electromagnetic lock re-engages, making it immovable again.

    Finally, he lied to Ito about the glass being chemically bonded.
  • Let's start with a simple blue.

    The culprit is Sir Charles, with Jorge as an accomplice.

    Sir Charles wanted the Argos Engine and didn't want to risk losing the case against the museum, so he impersonated Miss Mystery and hosted the gala. He paid Jorge off to help him with the crime.

    The glass case was, infact, not chemically bonded, but locked with an electromagnetic lock (the glass reaches into a groove in the floor, and the electromagnetic lock is under there, holding the glass in place)

    Charles had Jorge plant the EMP device when he was alone in the security room. When the EMP goes off, it blows the fuse, thus disabling the electromagnetic lock in addition to the lights.

    During the chaos, Charles removed the now-movable glass, took the Argos Engine, placed the card there, then put the glass back. He then hid it somewhere on the venue, in a hidden compartment or maybe the male bathroom. After all, he's the owner of the property so there may be a hidden compartment only he knows about.

    Once the light was fixed, the electromagnetic lock re-engages, making it immovable again.

    Finally, he lied to Ito about the glass being chemically bonded.
  • Let's start with a simple blue.

    The culprit is Sir Charles, with Jorge as an accomplice.

    Sir Charles wanted the Argos Engine and didn't want to risk losing the case against the museum, so he impersonated Miss Mystery and hosted the gala. He paid Jorge off to help him with the crime.

    The glass case was, infact, not chemically bonded, but locked with an electromagnetic lock (the glass reaches into a groove in the floor, and the electromagnetic lock is under there, holding the glass in place)

    Charles had Jorge plant the EMP device when he was alone in the security room. When the EMP goes off, it blows the fuse, thus disabling the electromagnetic lock in addition to the lights.

    During the chaos, Charles removed the now-movable glass, took the Argos Engine, placed the card there, then put the glass back. He then hid it somewhere on the venue, in a hidden compartment or maybe the male bathroom. After all, he's the owner of the property so there may be a hidden compartment only he knows about.

    Once the light was fixed, the electromagnetic lock re-engages, making it immovable again.

    Finally, he lied to Ito about the glass being chemically bonded.
  • Let's start with a simple blue.

    The culprit is Sir Charles, with Jorge as an accomplice.

    Sir Charles wanted the Argos Engine and didn't want to risk losing the case against the museum, so he impersonated Miss Mystery and hosted the gala. He paid Jorge off to help him with the crime.

    The glass case was, infact, not chemically bonded, but locked with an electromagnetic lock (the glass reaches into a groove in the floor, and the electromagnetic lock is under there, holding the glass in place)

    Charles had Jorge plant the EMP device when he was alone in the security room. When the EMP goes off, it blows the fuse, thus disabling the electromagnetic lock in addition to the lights.

    During the chaos, Charles removed the now-movable glass, took the Argos Engine, placed the card there, then put the glass back. He then hid it somewhere on the venue, in a hidden compartment or maybe the male bathroom. After all, he's the owner of the property so there may be a hidden compartment only he knows about.

    Once the light was fixed, the electromagnetic lock re-engages, making it immovable again.

    Finally, he lied to Ito about the glass being chemically bonded.
  • The glass was not held in place by an electromagnetic lock. It was chemically bonded to the base at the start of the night.
  • The glass was not held in place by an electromagnetic lock. It was chemically bonded to the base at the start of the night.
  • Deborah prepared a mercury replica of the Argos Engine with the card inside. She likely used the 3D printer to accomplish this. This was placed inside the temperature-regulated case and stayed all cool and solid. That way, she could slip out the real thing way beforehand and didn't have to worry about it. The EMP deactivated the electronics keeping the case all nice and cool, so the mercury melted and vanished through the holes into the ventilation system. (If the EMP device was too far away, there simply was another hidden closer to the case, *cough* for example inside the cake. *cough*)
  • The state within the case, although kept constant and stable, was not sufficiently different from the outside air that making the inside the same as the outside would make whatever was inside the case melt away, be it mercury, dry ice, or some other substance.
  • The cube is a hologram
    The culprit is Schultz
  • The cube is a hologram
    The culprit is Schultz
  • The cube is a hologram
    The culprit is Schultz
  • Roses are red

    Violets are blue

    -=The cube is a hologram

    The culprit is Schultz
  • The Engine inside was a fake from the start. The card was inside acted as a catalyst to dissolve or evaporate the device leaving no trace. Either that or there is just a fake bottom that flips around,
  • The Engine inside was a fake from the start. The card was inside acted as a catalyst to dissolve or evaporate the device leaving no trace. Either that or there is just a fake bottom that flips around,
  • The card is basic, well, actually pretty nice cardstock, and did not act as a catalyst for any chemical reaction.

    The Argos Engine was resting on the stand, not fixed to it. If the bottom flipped, the Engine would fall into the mechanisms.
  • There was definitely something physically present within the glass that looked like the Argos Engine when I examined it before the disappearance.
  • The Argos Engine replica inside the glass case was made of a higly flammable material! Moreover, inside it was some highly volatile substance that was rigged to catch fire at the slightest impact.

    The culprit waited for the blackout to happen, then kicked the stand to trigger the fire. The Argos replica was consumed in a burst of flame, which the culprit hid from view by covering the glass case with a cloth of some kind, such as a coat. The card had been encased in ice inside the replica, so the ice was melted leaving only it behind. Every other trace either burned away or fell into the small ventilation holes.
  • The destruction/burning/melting of a physical object in the glass case would not be instantaneous enough nor thorough enough to completely avoid detection.
  • The culprit is Sir Charles.

    The Engine in the case was a fake/replica. During the blackout the bottom flipped, sending the fake engine falling into the mechanism and bringing up the card, which was glued to the other side.

    Since the engine was a fake Sir Charles didn't really care if it gets damaged by the mechanism inside the base.

    Jorge was an accomplice. He planted the EMP rather than just disconnecting the fuse to make himself less suspicious.
  • The item observed in the glass case at the start of the story was the real Argos Engine.
  • The culprit was Sir Charles, for reasons suggested above, with Villasenor as accomplice setting off the EMP.

    The sides of the glass case were indeed chemically bonded to the base. The base was indeed fixed.

    However, the TOP of the case had been cut to create a kind of hinged flap made of glass.

    By maintaining a reasonably high gas pressure inside the container, the flap could be kept closed tight. However, once the lights went out, the air pressure was released, causing the flap to fall open, and allowing the thief to reach in and remove the Engine from above. Then, using a sticky material on their gloves, or a suction cup perhaps, they pulled the flap back up to reclose the case. They may have used some adhesive to ensure it stuck, but the repressurizing of the case would have been sufficient to hold it.
  • The edges of the five sides of glass are fused properly to each other as well to make it a cube in total, when fused to the edges of the base.
  • The culprit was Sir Charles, Jorge as accomplice. He decided that it would be better to risk real damage to the engine than to let his son have it if he lost the court case, so he used the flipping trick mentioned above. It could be retrieved from the base by force if needed later, intact or not.
  • No one who has had access to the Engine up until its disappearance would intentionally risk harming it.
  • Let's keep this going then. Same culprit, same accomplice, and they planned to avoid harm to the engine via padding. Either the mechanism inside the base was padded, or, more elegantly, the "deposit" the detective observed on the outside had been replaced with padding or casing that looked similar. This could have created an apparent difference in the size of the engine, but refractive tricks with the glass case were used to compensate.
  • The deposits were true deep-sea deposits on the real Engine, and were not intended to provide protection.

    There was not enough padding within the base that anyone who wished the Engine undamaged would allow it to fall into the base.
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